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dc.contributor.authorSKIGIN, Pavel
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-14T14:20:07Z
dc.date.available2020-12-14T14:20:07Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationAlexander ETKIND and Mykhailo MINAKOV (eds), Ideology after Union : political doctrines, Stuttgart : Ibidem Verlag, [2020], Soviet and post-Soviet politics and society, 216, pp. 93-110en
dc.identifier.isbn9783838213880
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/69242
dc.description.abstract“Since any order is better than any disorder, any order is established”— this Hobbesian observation by Adam Przeworski captures the existing level of certainty about the classification of the current Russian regime (1991: 86). The mere existence of the Russian Leviathan is the only fact beyond doubt, its genus and species being a matter of controversy: is it an electoral authoritarianism, a hybrid regime, a managed or defective democracy, an autocracy, a petro-state, or perhaps a fascist state, as asserted by Alexander Motyl 2016? The answer would not only interest scholars but also elucidate the country’s prospects and the probability of regime change (Fisun 2012: 91).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIbidem Verlagen
dc.publisherIbidem Verlag
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleNeopatrimonialism : the Russian regime through a Weberian lensen
dc.typeContribution to booken


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